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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTSRT8 View Post
    While yes they are pretty useless...however I made a set for my G37. I put extra grounding in & saw an increase in the speed of shifting with the paddles. On a G37 there is a good lag from the paddles. Once I did this it was non existent.
    I never would pay for these though.
    How did / does a larger awg result in quicker movement at a transmission solenoid, when its not part of the actuator's electrical path?
    Last edited by Hemissary; 06-15-2019 at 04:07 PM.
    2005 Magnum RT---Viper Venom Red----440ci Aluminum block----Short Runner Valve Intake--410mm BAER 6S Monoblock Extreme--Eibach Multi-Pro 2

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  2. #17
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    Sep 2011
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    Act of God....Man don't know. But I saw the result.
    I STILL wouldn't tell anyone to buy into them though.

  3. #18
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    Jan 2016
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    Both the resistance and inductance will decrease as the wire diameter increases keeping all other factors the same. Large transient loads will experience faster rise times with thicker gauge cables. Because the ground lead as you mentioned earlier is just part of the total circuit, the effect should be minimal. Increase the size of all the cables in the path and provide better (less) contact resistance and you may make a difference. But why? The single biggest load is the starter and it seems to work just fine.

    My last car did have a problem with the contact resistance on the ground connection to the electric steering. Because the lug connected to aluminum and it was made poorly at the factory, I lost all power boost! Heavier gauge wire would do nothing if your contact resistance is high.

    Several years back, there were discussions on upping the 12 v system in cars to 42v. That direction appears to have died. I never researched the reasons but I'm sure a reduction in pounds of copper per car was a consideration.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Rod Joe View Post
    Several years back, there were discussions on upping the 12 v system in cars to 42v. That direction appears to have died. I never researched the reasons but I'm sure a reduction in pounds of copper per car was a consideration.
    I work in the diesel truck field. There is serious talk about having the trucks go back to 24 or 48v, cause the electrical demand on these new trucks are too much for the 4 12v 950cca batteries they use now.
    The electrical systems on these trucks are insane.

  5. #20
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    Jan 2016
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    The high pressure fuel injection system must pull a few amps at 12v. An engineer buddy of mine worked on the design of the manufacturing and test rigs for the injectors.

    Think about the increase in the electrical system loads on modern vehicles compare to 25 years ago

    Fuel pumps/injectors
    Electric radiator fans
    Power steering
    Water pumps (bmw)
    Start/stop system
    Antilock brakes
    Diff lockers
    Mag ride suspensions
    Heated seats

  6. #21
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    Sep 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Rod Joe View Post
    Both the resistance and inductance will decrease as the wire diameter increases keeping all other factors the same. Large transient loads will experience faster rise times with thicker gauge cables. Because the ground lead as you mentioned earlier is just part of the total circuit, the effect should be minimal. Increase the size of all the cables in the path and provide better (less) contact resistance and you may make a difference. But why? The single biggest load is the starter and it seems to work just fine.

    My last car did have a problem with the contact resistance on the ground connection to the electric steering. Because the lug connected to aluminum and it was made poorly at the factory, I lost all power boost! Heavier gauge wire would do nothing if your contact resistance is high.

    Several years back, there were discussions on upping the 12 v system in cars to 42v. That direction appears to have died. I never researched the reasons but I'm sure a reduction in pounds of copper per car was a consideration.
    I=E/R is the electronic formula for determining the values of amperage, voltage or resistance when two are known. There is no variable in the formula for Inductance, the tendency of a circuit element, typically a conducting coil, in which electromotive force is generated by electromagnetic induction.

  7. #22
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Rod Joe View Post
    Think about the increase in the electrical system loads on modern vehicles compare to 25 years ago...
    Yes, there's a marked difference in technology, even when comparing early EFI systems to the present day. It's one of the reasons I enjoy tinkering with my '92 truck which has electronic fuel injection (EFI) but still has a cabled throttle. I even have to manually trim my fuel pressure +/- 3 psi with seasonal temperature changes.

    The application of aftermarket ignition systems and related stuff requires a myriad of electrical and wiring changes, including the installation of isolation transformers in strategic locations to protect sensitive electronics from potentially damaging frequency harmonics. It's for this reason that delving into EFI is best left to OEM and turn-key solutions which are engineered to operate within specific tolerances.

    If you really think about EFI in detail, there are a number of critical sensors that represent single points of failure, specifically the manifold absolute pressure sensor, the camshaft position sensor, the crankshaft position sensor, among others. These are consumables that must be replaced periodically. These sensors typically degrade via exposure to heat. Intermittent failures in these and other critical sensors can wreak havoc on performance, produce rough idles and difficult starts, etc.

    Maintaining good engine performance starts with knowledge about how the EFI and other systems work, and how their respective sensors interact holistically. That said, having a predictive maintenance schedule, beyond fluids, is an important aspect of owning and enjoying our cars. Furthermore, you won't necessarily find the replacement of sensors as part of the maintenance schedule in the owners manual. Most of us wait for hard codes to determine when sensor replacement is necessary. For example, based on my wideband AFR displays, I can determine when my upstream and downstream O2 sensors are beginning to get lazy and should be replaced.

    This is the kind of knowledge that's pertinent to lxforum members. Anyway, that's what I think...such as it is...

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hot Rod Joe View Post
    Both the resistance and inductance will decrease as the wire diameter increases keeping all other factors the same. Large transient loads will experience faster rise times with thicker gauge cables. Because the ground lead as you mentioned earlier is just part of the total circuit, the effect should be minimal. Increase the size of all the cables in the path and provide better (less) contact resistance and you may make a difference. But why? The single biggest load is the starter and it seems to work just fine.

    My last car did have a problem with the contact resistance on the ground connection to the electric steering. Because the lug connected to aluminum and it was made poorly at the factory, I lost all power boost! Heavier gauge wire would do nothing if your contact resistance is high.

    Several years back, there were discussions on upping the 12 v system in cars to 42v. That direction appears to have died. I never researched the reasons but I'm sure a reduction in pounds of copper per car was a consideration.
    The key reason to increase future vehicle operating voltage (V), is efficiency. For a given resistance, current decreases as operating V rises.
    2005 Magnum RT---Viper Venom Red----440ci Aluminum block----Short Runner Valve Intake--410mm BAER 6S Monoblock Extreme--Eibach Multi-Pro 2

    Custom--Grille Work--Hood--Headlights--Side View Mirrors--Rear Spoiler--Rear Diffuser--SRV Control System--Turbine Wheels


  9. #24
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    Last I heard / read, the main reasons for adopting a higher operating V was for fuel mileage / power increase and a reduction in emissions. The idea being to add a mild hybrid system that incorporates a generator instead of an alternator and some sort of regenerative braking system that serves to increase fuel mileage.

    I've heard 36, 42, 48 and (recently) as much as 72VDC are being tested. Some of these values correspond to multiples of Lithium technology series / parallel charged and discharged V (at ~4.2V charged / cell, IEEE and SAE both confirmed 42V as the ideal voltage a number of years ago). Getting away from flooded batteries is also a good thing, Lithium is way more efficient in it's own right.
    Last edited by Hemissary; Yesterday at 02:04 PM.
    2005 Magnum RT---Viper Venom Red----440ci Aluminum block----Short Runner Valve Intake--410mm BAER 6S Monoblock Extreme--Eibach Multi-Pro 2

    Custom--Grille Work--Hood--Headlights--Side View Mirrors--Rear Spoiler--Rear Diffuser--SRV Control System--Turbine Wheels


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